PARKINSON'S DISEASE AND MOVEMENT DISORDERS


 

DR. DUMA’S QUALIFICATIONS

Dr. Christopher Duma has been surgically managing movement disorders since 1987. He was formally trained in this subspecialty at the University of Pittsburgh during a one-year fellowship in 1990. His résume includes more than 250 pallidotomies or thalamotomies, 45 fetal tissue transplantations, 60 Gamma Knife thalamotomies, and numerous deep brain stimulator (DBS) implantations. His surgeries are performed at Hoag Hospital in beautiful Newport Beach, California, and South Coast Medical Center in Laguna Beach, California.


TREMOR CHANGES YOUR LIFE

Living with tremor can be frustrating and even embarrassing, especially if your medications are no longer effective. If your arms and hand tremble, simple activities like eating, drinking, and writing are difficult, and social activities like playing cards or golfing may be impossible. For ma


TREMOR

You know what tremor is like – the repetitive, involuntary contraction and relaxation of muscles. Some people have tremor on only one side of their body; others have tremor on both sides. Tremor is the only symptom of essential tremor and is a common symptom of Parkinson’s disease.


ESSENTIAL TREMOR

Essential tremor is the most common movement disorder. It is sometimes called familial or hereditary tremor because it is often inherited. The tremor usually affects the arms or hands and is most evident while the limb is in a sustained posture or performing an action. Most individuals with essential tremor have a mild form, but others progress to sever “flapping” movements. Essential tremor usually affects both sides of the body and is made worse by stress or anxiety.


PARKINSON’S DISEASE

Parkinson’s disease is a primary cause of neurological disability in people over 60 years of age. Many of those affected suffer from tremor. Parkinsonian tremor most often occurs in the arms or hands while they are at rest or in a fixed position. Tremor usually begins on one side and progresses to the other side within a few years. Stress and fatigue may aggravate Parkinsonian tremor.

Location
Christopher Duma, MD, FACS
3900 West Coast Highway, Suite 300
Newport Beach, CA 92663
Phone: 949-209-9232
Fax: 949.642.4833
Office Hours

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949-209-9232